Fukuoka

A 4-post collection,

March 2021 – Kabusecha from Fukuoka

This month, we selected a Kabusecha (かぶせ茶), from the region of Yame (八女) in the prefecture of Fukuoka (福岡). Kabusecha from Yame Kabusecha is classified between Gyokuro (玉露) and Sencha (煎茶), and is somewhat more affordable than Gyokuro. It is prepared by covering the tea leaves to protect them from direct sunlight during the last 5 to 7 days before harvest. For Gyokuro, the tea leaves are covered for around 20 days before harvest. Protecting the tea leaves from the
- March 2021 – Kabusecha from Fukuoka

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February 2019 – Gyokuro from Hoshino

Thank you for your patience! Finally, we are sending you Gyokuro again. This month we selected a Gyokuro (玉露) from the village of Hoshino (星野村), in the district of Yame (八女), in the prefecture of Fukuoka (福岡). Gyokuro It is said that Gyokuro is the king of Japanese green teas. Gyokuro is often translated as “jade dew” as its color reminds that of jade. For the elaboration of Gyokuro, you can see our blogpost from September 2015. I compare Gyokuro
- February 2019 – Gyokuro from Hoshino

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April 2016 – Sakuracha from Fukuoka, Kyūshū

Spring is here! This month we selected a Sakuracha (桜茶), from the prefecture of Fukuoka (福岡) in Kyūshū (九州). Sakuracha Sakuracha (桜茶) literally means a cherry blossom (桜) tea (茶). It’s not a green tea, but an infustion made of salted cherry blossoms. Sakuracha became popular among people of Edo (the former name of Tōkyō) in the Edo period (1603-1868). At that time, we called it “cherry blossom hot water (桜湯)”. There are some Japanese expressions, which do not
- April 2016 – Sakuracha from Fukuoka, Kyūshū

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September 2015 - Gyokuro from Yame

For the September shipment we have selected the highest grade tea of Japan -Gyokuro- from its greatest appellation: the city of Yame located in the Fukuoka prefecture. Gyokuro Gyokuro (玉露) is a type of Sencha (煎茶). It has a round and sweet taste with a brilliant green color, similar to jade. Hence the name "Gyokuro", which means literally "dew of jade". Gyokuro is considered a luxury tea in Japan, so Japanese don’t drink it as an everyday tea, but
- September 2015 - Gyokuro from Yame

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