Alexis Tabary

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10 posts, New York City,

August 2020 - Sencha from Miyazaki

After a long break of three months, we started to send teas again, albeit only towards a few countries. To restart our operations, we went back to basics, with a sencha (煎茶) from Miyazaki (宮崎), on the island of Kyūshū (九州). Sencha from Miyazaki Among all Japanese green teas, sencha is what most people think about when they think of "green tea". It is by far the most popular tea in Japan, representing 80% of the national green tea production.
- August 2020 - Sencha from Miyazaki

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October 2018 - Sencha from Kagoshima

For once it's not Yasuko writing about tea! I don't have her knowledge of Japanese history and culture, but I will try to take you for a short trip to the South of Japan, from where I brought back the October 2018 selection: a Sencha (煎茶) from Kagoshima (鹿児島). Ibusuki Kyūshū (九州) is the southernmost island among the four main islands of the Japanese archipelago. Kyūshū litteraly means "nine states", and is thus composed of nine prefectures. Interestingly, the name
- October 2018 - Sencha from Kagoshima

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August 2015 - Mugicha from Hyogo

It's summer time in Japan! That means humidity and warmth: way way way too much of both. To survive in this environment Japanese people rely on a pecular drink called Mugicha... so here is our August 2015 pick: Mugicha (麦茶) from Hyogo (兵庫). What is Mugicha? Mugicha is a roasted barley tea. As a consequence it is completely caffeine-free so Japanese people do not hesitate to drink as much of it as they need to fight off the heat. In
- August 2015 - Mugicha from Hyogo

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July 2015 - Sencha from Kagoshima

For the July shipment, we have selected a Sencha (煎茶) from Kagoshima (鹿児島). This tea qualifies as a Shincha (新茶) since it is made from the first harvest of the year. Sencha Sencha (煎茶) is the most popular green tea in Japan, and is served with most Japanese meals. 80% of Japanese green teas are Sencha. The word itself comes from the Japanese verb "senjiru" (煎じる) which means "to infuse (with something)". Very thin needle-like tealeaves of Sencha have a
- July 2015 - Sencha from Kagoshima

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June 2015 - Shincha from Mie

Spring is the season of Shincha (新茶), or “new tea“ in Japanese. So for the June shipment we selected a delicious new Fukamushi Sencha (深蒸し煎茶) from Ise (伊勢), in the prefecture of Mie (三重). Shincha Tealeaves are usually harvested 4 or 5 times a year, starting from April until October, though it varies depending on the area and specific plantation. Shincha is the green tea made from the very first harvest of the year. Shincha is characterized by freshness, crispness
- June 2015 - Shincha from Mie

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